Fire Safe Life – A Fire Protection Collective

Fire Fighters plus Fire Sprinklers Save Lives and Protect Property

Welcome to Fire Safe Life

Welcome to Fire Safe Life,

Fire Safe Life came about as a place for Fire Protection Professionals to come together and discuss fire prevention. We searched the Internet for a website that was open to everyone and after a thorough search we did not find it. We found many fire sprinkler sites that were run by big companies and governing bodies, but nothing for the rest of us.

Fire Safe Life wants all Fire Protection businesses and Fire Fighter’s to take part. Without your help this venture will not be possible. We would like readers to send in questions and have the pros answer them. This is a place to share and help each other.

Fire Safe Life is not here to change the world, but to spread the word on how important fire protection is to your community.

Fire Safe Life is open to all. If you have something to say, a question to ask, a story to tell, we would like to hear it. Let’s be helpful to the designer, the engineer and others that might need a little inspiration. We would like advice from our more experienced practitioners to make Fire Safe Life a pool of knowledge for all.

Would you like to Guest Post at Fire Safe Life, See our Guest Post Guidelines.

Fire Pit Safety During the Winter Season

This is a guest post by Karen Ho Fatt. If you would like to Guest Post, check out the Guidelines here.

Not everyone hunkers down and hibernates during the winter. In fact, with backyard fire pit usage growing in popularity, more and more people are enjoying crisp winter evenings outdoors, in the comfort of their patio paradise. Along with this trend is the need for an increased awareness of residential fire safety in addition to the common sense steps taken when having a wintertime fire. Let’s take a moment to review fire pit safety during the winter season.

As with any outdoor fire, whether at a campground or in your backyard, careful attention should be paid to the surrounding foliage. During autumn, dried leaves and plant material can accumulate around the fire pit, providing quick burning fuel for a stray ember to ignite. Clear any dead vegetation to at least 10 feet from around the fire pit. This way, if you burn soft woods to create that wonderful crackle we all love, the popping embers won’t have anything to start a fire with.

Continue reading

How to Prepare Your Home in Case of Fire

This is a guest post by Sally Davidson. If you would like to Guest Post, check out the Guidelines here.

If your home fire alarm woke you up in the middle of the night, would you know what to do? If not, here are some steps you can take to create a home fire escape plan.

1. Make an Escape Plan – Work together with your family to draw a map of your home – graph paper makes this easy. Mark the location of all doors and windows as well. Then designate two ways to escape from every room, giving special consideration to the bedrooms.

2. Discuss Responsibilities – Another important part of your escape plan should take into account any family members who might need help escaping, such as the very young or those with disabilities. Give each family member specific responsibilities. For example, siblings who sleep in the same room can wake each other up. Emphasize that you will work as a team.

3. Choose Meeting Places – You should choose two meeting places. The first should be an obvious place outside your home. The second should be further away, such as at the end of the street, in case it isn’t safe to be so close to the house. Mark these places on the escape plan.

4. Emergency Contacts – Post emergency numbers next to every phone in your house and program them into your cell phone. Designate a friend or relative who lives nearby as your emergency contact person. Make sure your children have this number memorized, along with your own address and number.

Continue reading

How to Perform a Monthly Fire Extinguisher Inspection

This is a guest post by Nick at Guardian Fire Protection. If you would like to Guest Post, check out the Guidelines here.

There’s nothing more important than having well-maintained fire extinguishers in your building – the keyword being “well-maintained”! It’s important to have your fire extinguishers professionally inspected once a year, but it’s arguably MORE important to inspect them yourself every month! Fortunately, it’s hard to go wrong with your monthly fire extinguisher inspection – it’s actually pretty easy.

Monthly Fire Extinguisher Self-Inspection

Monthly fire extinguisher inspections don’t need to be exhaustive – just a quick check over should be fine. And while they should not take the place of professional fire extinguisher inspections, they should definitely supplement them. The important things to check during your monthly fire extinguisher inspections are:

  • Accessibility – make sure your fire extinguishers are where they are supposed to be and are easily visible and accessible during a fire. Make sure they are kept within 25 ft of an exit and are not located in corners.
  • Physical condition – make sure that the pin in the extinguisher head is intact and the tamper seal is not broken. Also check the condition of the extinguisher shell, hose and nozzle for signs of obvious physical damage, corrosion or leakage.
  • Pressure gauge – make sure the needle on the pressure gauge is in the green –this will let you know that the extinguisher pressure is good. Also, lift the fire extinguisher to make sure it’s full, just in case.
  • Sign off – when you finish your fire extinguisher inspection, initial and date the back of the tag to state that you performed your fire extinguisher inspection. If you have any more fire extinguishers in your building, make sure you do the same thing for all of them.
  • Continue reading

    Fire Safety During Home Renovation

    This is a guest post by Chuck Lorrell. If you would like to Guest Post, check out the Guidelines here.

    Are you having your home renovated? Here are 10 things you should consider to make your home fire-resistant.

    1. Fire Extinguishers – Make sure that there is a portable fire extinguisher on the worksite. Depending on the size of the project, you may want to have more than one. Even a small fire can create major damage if it isn’t taken care of immediately. Multi-purpose models (Type ABC) are best for a construction site.

    2. Existing Alarms – Never disconnect your fire and burglar alarms during a home renovation project. If sanding or plaster work is being done, you may want to consider putting a plastic bag over them during the day, but don’t forget to take them off when work is finished.

    3. Sprinklers – For a larger project, you may want to consider installing a residential sprinkler system, which can provide protection against a major fire.

    4. Clean Up – Make sure that scrap materials and debris are cleaned up from the site daily, as they can be highly combustible. Even materials like cardboard, rags, and solvents are extremely flammable, and so it is important that these are picked up as well.

    5. Doors – Doors made of solid wood or metal will resist fires much more than hollow ones.

    Continue reading

    Support FSL

    Facebook

    Internet Search

    Fire Safe Poll

    How many Fire Pumps does your company install in a year?

    View Results

    Loading ... Loading ...

    Fire Rescue 1