Fire Safe Life – A Fire Protection Collective

Fire Fighters plus Fire Sprinklers Save Lives and Protect Property

Welcome to Fire Safe Life

Welcome to Fire Safe Life,

Fire Safe Life came about as a place for Fire Protection Professionals to come together and discuss fire prevention. We searched the Internet for a website that was open to everyone and after a thorough search we did not find it. We found many fire sprinkler sites that were run by big companies and governing bodies, but nothing for the rest of us.

Fire Safe Life wants all Fire Protection businesses and Fire Fighter’s to take part. Without your help this venture will not be possible. We would like readers to send in questions and have the pros answer them. This is a place to share and help each other.

Fire Safe Life is not here to change the world, but to spread the word on how important fire protection is to your community.

Fire Safe Life is open to all. If you have something to say, a question to ask, a story to tell, we would like to hear it. Let’s be helpful to the designer, the engineer and others that might need a little inspiration. We would like advice from our more experienced practitioners to make Fire Safe Life a pool of knowledge for all.

Would you like to Guest Post at Fire Safe Life, See our Guest Post Guidelines.

The History of Automatic Sprinkler Protection, Part One

Part 1 – The Beginnings, Perforated Piping Systems

The forerunners of the automatic sprinkler system were the perforated pipe and open sprinkler. The perforated pipe system, as its name implies, was simply a series of small perforated pipes attached to the ceiling and divided into sections.

In 1806 John Carey filed a patent in London for a perforated pipe concept for fire protection systems, but the system never gained acceptance. The world’s first recognizable sprinkler system was installed in the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in the United Kingdom in 1812 The apparatus consisted of a cylindrical airtight reservoir of 400 hogsheads fed by a 10 inch water main which branched to all parts of the theater. A series of smaller pipes feed from the distribution pipe were pierced with a series of ½” holes.

From 1852 to 1885, perforated pipe systems were used in textile mills throughout New England as a means of fire protection. The Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company, later to become the Grinnell Company, was a major installer of these systems.

James B Francis was one of the first to develop a system of perforated pipes and his system was installed many New England mills. Other systems were the Whiting system, Hall system and Grinnell system. Each system having a different spacing ,and sizes of holes in an attempt to effectively distribute the water. The Hall system is notable in that it used galvanized sheet metal piping. It was soon removed from service as unreliable.

These early systems did establish some basic design concepts, Such as spacing of lines, and sizing of the pipes. One early rule was that the sizes of the pipes were of such size that the area of the orifices would not exceed 50 per cent of the area of the pipe that fed them.

Frederick Grinnell’s first patent, on March 12, 1878, concerned perforated “sprinkling-tube” that had the holes bushed with a non-corrodible material such as brass. This indicates that potential clogging of the perforations due to oxidation of the iron pipe was a major problem.

The success of perforated sprinkler piping was short lived. It is evident that with this system there was a great waste of water, and probably poor distribution. Furthermore, the systems were not in any way automatic. They were manually activated by the building occupants. By discharging water over the entire area of the room where there was no fire, the water damage usually greatly exceeded the fire damage. The lack of automatic operation was the main problem as nearly all of the highly destructive fires occurred at night when there was no one in attendance.

Next – The First Automatic Sprinklers

Electrical Home Inspection for Fire Prevention

This is a guest post by Dorian Adams. If you would like to Guest Post, check out the Guidelines here.

A possible fire hazard in your home could very well include your electrical connections. Many people overlook this prevalent source of potential danger and often don’t consider it until it’s too late. A thorough electrical home inspection conducted by a homeowner and a professional electrician can help to prevent fire as well as electrical damage.

Outlets, Switches, and Wall Plates

Outlets that have exposed wiring or connection points may indicate a possible source of electrical fire. Old outlets can be replaced and updated, as well as their related wall plates. Wall plates that are cracked or broken can expose wiring, which should always be covered and properly secured. Light switches that are hot to touch or make noise can also be a cause for concern. Faulty light switches may indicate an internal problem with loose connections or bad contacts, which can lead to an electrical fire.

Electrical Cords

While it may seem like common sense, electrical cords should be in good condition when in use. Frays and other noticeable damages are a possible hazard. Cords should not be placed over furniture, under rugs or carpeting, or attached in some way to the wall or floor. Extension cords, as well, have the same associated potential dangers, and they are not meant to be used permanently. If more outlets and likewise more electrical capacity are needed, it is vitally important to meet those needs that your home’s electrical usage requires. Inadequate electrical capacity can lead to a power surge that can cause a fire or at least serious damage to large appliances and other devices.

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Fire Protection through Sprinkler and Suppression Systems

This is a guest post by Martha Newbold. who writes for If you would like to Guest Post, check out the Guidelines here.

A quality sprinkler system is critical in safeguarding a business or residential building from the devastation that a fire can cause.

In the UK, the British Automatic Fire Sprinkler Association, known as BAFSA, is responsible for over 85% of all sprinkler installations in the United Kingdom. Their goal is to keep people informed about the benefits of having a sprinkler system, as well as being a significant stakeholder in fire safely legislation and standards.

Sprinklers in the UK must be installed to a certain standard. Domestic and residential buildings currently must comply with standard BS 9251: 2005, whilst the commercial and industrial building equivalent is standard BS EN12845: 2004. These safety and security legislations are scheduled to be revised in the near future as part of an on-going review of fire safety guidelines in the UK.

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