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The History of Automatic Sprinkler Protection, Part One

Part 1 – The Beginnings, Perforated Piping Systems

The forerunners of the automatic sprinkler system were the perforated pipe and open sprinkler. The perforated pipe system, as its name implies, was simply a series of small perforated pipes attached to the ceiling and divided into sections.

In 1806 John Carey filed a patent in London for a perforated pipe concept for fire protection systems, but the system never gained acceptance. The world’s first recognizable sprinkler system was installed in the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane in the United Kingdom in 1812 The apparatus consisted of a cylindrical airtight reservoir of 400 hogsheads fed by a 10 inch water main which branched to all parts of the theater. A series of smaller pipes feed from the distribution pipe were pierced with a series of ½” holes.

From 1852 to 1885, perforated pipe systems were used in textile mills throughout New England as a means of fire protection. The Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company, later to become the Grinnell Company, was a major installer of these systems.

James B Francis was one of the first to develop a system of perforated pipes and his system was installed many New England mills. Other systems were the Whiting system, Hall system and Grinnell system. Each system having a different spacing ,and sizes of holes in an attempt to effectively distribute the water. The Hall system is notable in that it used galvanized sheet metal piping. It was soon removed from service as unreliable.

These early systems did establish some basic design concepts, Such as spacing of lines, and sizing of the pipes. One early rule was that the sizes of the pipes were of such size that the area of the orifices would not exceed 50 per cent of the area of the pipe that fed them.

Frederick Grinnell’s first patent, on March 12, 1878, concerned perforated “sprinkling-tube” that had the holes bushed with a non-corrodible material such as brass. This indicates that potential clogging of the perforations due to oxidation of the iron pipe was a major problem.

The success of perforated sprinkler piping was short lived. It is evident that with this system there was a great waste of water, and probably poor distribution. Furthermore, the systems were not in any way automatic. They were manually activated by the building occupants. By discharging water over the entire area of the room where there was no fire, the water damage usually greatly exceeded the fire damage. The lack of automatic operation was the main problem as nearly all of the highly destructive fires occurred at night when there was no one in attendance.

Next – The First Automatic Sprinklers

Foreign Fire Sprinklers

Foreign Fire Sprinklers

A Guest Post Submitted By Mike W

Have you ever wondered about the use of fire sprinklers outside the U.S.? There are actually many countries that use and manufacture sprinkler heads. The use of sprinklers now spans the entire globe. Sprinklers can be found on every continent with Antarctica being a possible exception. However, sprinklers are not manufactured on every continent.

I have been collecting sprinkler heads for a little over six years, but I have recently gained a special interest in sprinklers from other countries. In January of 2009, I purchased my first foreign-made sprinkler heads. My first foreign heads were from England and Denmark. While Denmark is host to one manufacturer, “GW”, England is home to the most sprinkler companies outside of the U.S. These brands include: Mather & Platt (Grinnell), Atlas, Matthew Hall, Spraysafe, Wormald (British sector), Titan, Firekil, and Angus. Continue reading

Glass Bulb Sprinklers

Grinnell Quartz Bulb 1931

I’m sure everyone is familiar with glass bulb fire sprinklers. So much so in fact that they may not be familiar with fusible link sprinklers. The glass bulb is considered the standard type of sprinkler operation today. But, us older folks in the sprinkler community remember a time when the fusible link sprinklers were the standard. But did you know that the glass bulb sprinkler has been around over 80 years!

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The History of Automatic Sprinkler Protection Part 4 – Frederick Grinnell

The History of Automatic Sprinkler Protection
Part 4 – Frederick Grinnell

Frederick Grinnell was born in New Bedford, Massachusetts. In 1855, he graduated from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Earlier in his career, he was draftsman, construction engineer, and manager for various railroad manufacturers. He designed and oversaw construction of more than 100 locomotives.

Frederick Grinnell’s career in fire protection began at the age of 33 with his purchase of the Providence Steam and Gas Pipe Company. In the early days the company started in fire protection installing perforated piping systems, one of the first to do so. Grinnell took out a large number of patents. Under him the company became the leading fire protection company in the country. Many of the installation rules can be traced back to this company.

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